Ryan Duffy Sullivan

Ryan Duffy Sullivan has 12 years of broad experience in the areas of construction law, bankruptcy, commercial litigation and real estate law. He represents subcontractors and material suppliers relative to all phases of construction, from contract negotiation and drafting to litigation and collection. He prides himself on understanding his clients’ work and the unique challenges posed by each project in order to deliver maximum results.

In addition to his construction practice, Ryan has wide-ranging experience as counsel to Chapter 7 and 13 Debtors, and both secured and unsecured creditors in the bankruptcy arena.

Ryan is a frequent lecturer before professional groups in the area of commercial collections, and a contributor to West’s Bankruptcy Series Bankruptcy Exemption Manual and contributor to the ABA Forum on Construction Law’s Under Construction seasonal publication.

Memberships

Mr. Sullivan is admitted to practice in the state courts of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia (inactive), Maryland, and the District of Columbia. He is admitted to practice before the United States Courts of Appeals for the First and Fourth Circuits, and the United States District Courts for the Districts of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maryland, and the Eastern District of Virginia.

Education

Mr. Sullivan earned his J.D. from the Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law, and his B.A., magna cum laude, from Stonehill College.

Honors

2012-2016 Massachusetts Super Lawyers Rising Star

Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly

  • Coercion not required for extortion scheme
    The town of Lee’s former chief of police, who took $4,000 from a duo accused of running a house of ill repute, could be convicted of extortion even though he did not coerce the payers to participate, the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. Tom Fusco and Tara Viola owned and operated an inn. Viola […]
  • Commercial – Note – Limitations – Partial payment
    Where a complaint to collect on a promissory note was dismissed under the six-year statute of limitations (G.L.c. 106, §3-118), the dismissal order should be reversed given the applicability of the common-law partial payment rule. “… On March 24, 2005, [defendant] VideogeniX’s predecessor signed a note for $30,000 in favor of [plaintiff] Zelby’s predecessor. The note […]

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